Exceptional Scientific Achievement Medal

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Dr Ichtiaque Rasool received the NASA Exceptional Scientific Achievement Medal in 1974.

This is an award given for unusually significant scientific accomplishments which contribute to the programs of NASA, the Department of Defense,and other government agencies.

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COSPAR William Nordberg Medal

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Dr Rasool recieved the COSPAR WILLIAM NORDBERG MEDAL in 1988. This medal commemorates the work of the late William Nordberg and is awarded to a scientist who has made a distinguished contribution to the application of space science in a field covered by COSPAR.

COSPAR

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After the USSR launched its first Earth Satellite in 1957 and thereby opened the space age, the International Council of Scientific Unions (ICSU), now the International Council for Science, established its Committee on Space Research (COSPAR) during an international meeting in London in 1958. COSPAR’s first Space Science Symposium was organized in Nice, France in January 1960.

COSPAR’s objectives are to promote scientific research in space, with emphasis on the exchange of results, information and opinions, and to provide a forum, open to all scientists, for the discussion of problems that may affect scientific space research. These objectives are achieved through the organization of Scientific Assemblies, publications and other means.

Dr Rasool became a member of Working Group 6 (Application of Space Techniques to Meteorology and Earth Surveys)  in 1965. He was elected Chair of the Interdisciplinary Scientific Commission A (Space Studies of the Earth’s surface, meteorology and climate) in 1979 for a first term of 4 years, extended to 1984, and then a second term until 1988.

Dr Rasool recieved the COSPAR WILLIAM NORDBERG MEDAL in 1988. This medal commemorates the work of the late William Nordberg and is awarded to a scientist who has made a distinguished contribution to the application of space science in a field covered by COSPAR.

Potential of Remote Sensing for the Study of Global Change

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J.R.G. Townshend and S. I. Rasool

COSPAR report to the International Council of Scientific Unions (ICSU), Volume 7, Issue 1, Codata Bulletin, 24 (4) (special issue on Data for Global Change), 1-14, 1993

Published for the Committee on Space Research by Pergamon Press

Intensities of 9.4 microns and 10.4 microns CO2 bands

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S.I. Rasool

Memoires SOC. R. Sc. Liege, Fifth Serie, tome IX, Extract 1963

For the purposes of studying radiative properties of the atmospheres of the other planets, Venus and Mars for example, where the amount of CO2 in the atmosphere may be greater than in the earth’s by several orders of magnitude, these bands become important (Jastrow and Rasool, 1963). Therefore, in the absence of generally accepted values of the intensities of 9.4 p and 10.4 p bands, they have attempted to estimate them independently.

Publisher: NASA, Goddard Space Flight Center, Institute for Space Studies.

Surface Albedo and the Sahel Drought

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M.F.Courel; R.S. Kandel ; S.I. Rasool

Nature 307, 528 – 531 (09 February 1984)

The persistence of the Sahel drought, which reached a peak in 1973, appears to be typical for such dry episodes over past decades and centuries. Such strong persistence can be understood if a strong positive feedback mechanism is operating, partly driven by changes in surface properties. The key factors in the mechanisms thus far studied are the surface albedo and the soil moisture, both of which affect the radiation balance at the surface, the first directly, the second indirectly through its influence on the latent heat flux. We have now studied the evolution of the albedo of this region since 1972. We find that dry season albedo in the Sahel (notably Ferlo and Gondo regions) declined from a maximum close to 0.30 in 1973 to values close to 0.20 in 1979. This decline is consistent with changes in plant cover determined by analysis of spectral changes in the Landsat multispectral scanner (MSS) data and field studies.


Cloud Heights and Nighttime Cloud Cover from TIROS Radiation Data

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S. I. Rasool

Goddard Institute for Space Studies, NASA, New York, N.Y.

Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences, volume 21, pages 152–156.

Radiation data obtained from TIROS III has been analyzed, separately for day and for night, for the period July through September 1961. The global distribution of the average effective temperatures measured by the 8–12 μ channel of the satellite radiometer shows a close correlation with the cloud cover data.

An estimate of the latitudinal distribution of cloud heights has been obtained using the TIROS radiation data for daytime and the distribution of cloud cover recently obtained from the TIROS photographs. Combining these values of the cloud heights with the nighttime radiation data determines the latitudinal distribution of nighttime cloud cover.

The results indicate that in the Southern Hemisphere the percentage cloudiness at night is considerably higher than in the day, while in the case of the Northern Hemisphere the cloudiness appears to decrease at night.


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